Confused about faith and science? Read this book! A Review of Particles of Faith

Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on print
Love0
Share on facebook
Share on twitter
Share on linkedin
Share on email
Love0

“All this science I don’t understand” – Rocket Man, Elton John

I’ve had the pleasure of following Stacy Trasancos for years and there’s two things that always come to mind when I consider what she brings to Catholics: First, wow, she’s ridiculously smart and I’ll never catch up; and Second, praise God she has an amazing gift for explaining the tougher, scientific, parts of the faith. Or should I say particles of faith. … 🙂

A few years back she self-published her first book, Science Was Born of Christianity which was a pretty brave title, and the content did not disappoint. That got picked up by a [very smart] publisher and she’s got a new book that’s about as big as the hole in the ozone layer. Okay I’m kidding…

She recently released Particles of Faith: A Catholic Guide to Navigating Science going a step in the direction of non-academic and semi-academic Catholics, and this book is an amazing contribution to the Church. There are few qualified to write it, and this mother of [I lost count] … I just don’t know how she does does it. But she did. The book is amazing and I learned so much.

I’m one of those that gets pretty uncomfortable with the ideas of evolution, string theory, the multiverse theory, and I have a little skill in explaining – or attempting to defend – the church’s moral/scientific teaching when it comes to new scientific endeavors. I feel like the lyrics of Elton John’s Rocket Man, “All this science I don’t understand”

But thank God for Stacy Trasancos. She soothes so many worries and answers so many questions in this book. Really, things I didn’t even realize I needed to know, and ideas I had not yet questioned — she answers. If you didn’t know, she isn’t a lay science enthusiast; she’s a full blown scientist who was recognized and regarded in her field for her acumen and erudite understanding of the physical world. Now, she is a mother of [really, I did lose count] and shares her understanding of the Catholic faith and studies in metaphysics to engage readers in bridging faith and science.

So what do you get in this book? You’ll learn how to best approach and react to the world of science —- how not to freak out when a new “discovery” is reported. She has a nice section on a real-world example regarding the Big Bang Theory, and further enlightens on the realities of the subject. She also discusses, as expected, evolution. Yes, it real. Get used to it. No, it might not be what you think —- and Stacy answers some pretty important questions on that topic. Those were two high points for me; of course there is much more in this nearly 200 page book.

Who should buy this? Of course those interested in science, but also home school parents and teens. Those looking to enter the field of science and those who are completely scared (like me) and confused by the topics. Who shouldn’t buy it? Probably Stacy. Who cant afford not to buy it: Richard Dawkins.

But really, check this book out and add it to your shopping cart. Eventually, you’ll want the answers.

Love0

More Like This

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn
Share on email
Email
Love0