Introvert and don’t know what to say? Here are Five Ways to Break the Ice

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If you’re an introvert like I am, starting conversations probably doesn’t come very easily for you. And if you’re anything like me, you volunteer for things that sound fun before you realize that involves interacting with people you don’t know, which is great, even if it doesn’t feel that way at first.

So next time you’re wedged between the alto and tenor section of the choir you just joined or awkwardly standing around the sacristy with the other Eucharistic Ministers before the start of Mass or waiting behind an attractive person in line for coffee and doughnuts after Mass,  use any of these questions to break the ice.

Have you read Scott Hahn’s new book?

Or anything else you are reading that you think the other person might have heard of.

Are you involved in any other parish ministry? Or is there any ministry you think I’d enjoy?

If you’re out to make friends and you have time on your hands, this is a good one. Most people love talking about their ministries. And if you decide to join the Knights of Columbus or the Catholic Daughters, you’ll have a familiar face who will be happy to have recruited you.

Did you know today is the feast of St. John Plessington?

Now is not the time to be a show-off about your knowledge of English Catholic history, but it is okay to talk about your admiration of him and about religious freedom in 17th century England and in the world today. (And if you use this on any day other than July 19, knowing about or asking about the saint of the day is still a good way into a conversation.)

Know what’s on tap and available tonight? Theology on Tap. Yep.

This type of question doesn’t work for coffee and doughnuts after the 10:30 Mass or any other social event that’s been going on for as long as you can remember, but when your parish or diocese is trying a new ministry, it’s fun to find out how people found out about it. Who knows -you might meet the person who organized the event!

What did you think of Fr. Thomas’s homily?

Obviously this only works if you know that the other person went to the same Mass you did or that Fr. Thomas said more than one Mass on Sunday. But people like to share their opinions, and it’s fun to listen to different interpretations of the same homily.

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