Rocking Out With the Saints’ Playlists

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(cover image by Doxology Studios)

Music is the universal language. It speaks to all people, in all places, in all times, and in all cultures. Music unites all people. Something about music transcends all barriers. It is a taste of heaven. Being as it is a universal feature of all humankind, it is only fitting that the Church has something to say about it.

Sacrosanctum concilium states:

“The musical tradition of the universal Church is a treasure of inestimable value, greater even than that of any other art. The main reason for this pre-eminence is that, as sacred song united to the words, it forms a necessary or integral part of the solemn liturgy. Holy Scripture, indeed, has bestowed praise upon sacred song… Therefore sacred music is to be considered the more holy in proportion as it is more closely connected with the liturgical action, whether it adds delight to prayer, fosters unity of minds, or confers greater solemnity upon the sacred rites. But the Church approves of all forms of true art having the needed qualities, and admits them into divine worship… Liturgical worship is given a more noble form when the divine offices are celebrated solemnly in song, with the assistance of sacred ministers and the active participation of the people… Composers, filled with the Christian spirit, should feel that their vocation is to cultivate sacred music and increase its store of treasures. Let them produce compositions which have the qualities proper to genuine sacred music, not confining themselves to works which can be sung only by large choirs, but providing also for the needs of small choirs and for the active participation of the entire assembly of the faithful. The texts intended to be sung must always be in conformity with Catholic doctrine; indeed they should be drawn chiefly from holy scripture and from liturgical sources.” (SC, §112-121). [See also Musicam sacram]

That being said, and realizing that the following songs are not sacred music (some very far from it), I thought it would be fun to look at a few saints’ top song titles (only) on their playlists and see just what they might have been rocking out to on their mp3 players…if, you know, they had them…

1. St. Lucy – “These Eyes,” The Guess Who

2. St. Lawrence of Rome – “Up in Flames,” Coldplay

3. St. Jude – “Hey Jude,” The Beatles

4. St. Augustine – “Mama, I’m Coming Home,” Ozzie Osbourne

5. St. Joseph – “[Nice] Dream,” Radiohead

6. St. Peter – “I Am A Rock,” Simon & Garfunkel and “A Rush of Blood to the Head,” Coldplay

7. St. John the Baptist – “Down to the River to Pray,” Alison Krauss

8. St. John the Evangelist – “The Word,” The Beatles

9. St. Valentine – “My Funny Valentine,” the Frank Sinatra version

10. St. ArnoldAny pub song, by any writer, at any time, anywhere

11. St. Margaret Mary Alacoque – “I Will Possess Your Heart,” Death Cab for Cutie

12. St. Isidore the Farmer – “Isadore,” Incubus

13. St. James the Apostle – “Jerusalem,” Matisyahu

14. St. John Bosco – “Visions of Paradise,” The Moody Blues

15. St. Robert Bellarmine, SJ – “Doctor Robert,” The Beatles

16. St. Thomas the Apostle – “Thomas,” A Perfect Circle

17. St. Joseph of Cupertino – “Come Fly With Me,” Frank Sinatra

18. St. John Paul II – “Hope,” Rush

19. St. Bruno – “The Sound of Silence,” Simon & Garfunkel

20. St. Thomas Aquinas – “Effect & Cause,” The White Stripes

 

Bonus: Arius the Heresiarch –Hit Me Baby One More Time,” Brittney Spears

Please add your own in the comments section below!

 

Cover image by Doxology Studios.

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